What to do if Your Car Breaks Down in Traffic

Be Aware Of What Might Break On This Very Trip

Has it been a long time since you changed your oil? Did you notice a kind of weird whining sound when you pulled out of your driveway? Has that clunking sound been getting louder? These are all things to be mindful of, particularly if you’re driving a car given to you by your uncle who never cleans house even when relatives come over, if your car is a Saturn, or if you have ever bought anything ever off of Craigslist.

The idea is to be mindful and aware, even casually. If your car does suddenly break, it’s not a surprise, and that’s important.

Always Have An Exit Strategy

However, sometimes cars are cruel and they give you absolutely no warning whatsoever that they are about to fail you. Usually our cars do warn us, but we don’t always know how to listen for the signs.

In any case, knowing that disaster could strike at any time, always have in mind that this car could just shut off. Maybe even at this exact moment. When you’re in the far right lane of a highway, you can happily note that you’re next to the shoulder and can easily pull over. When you’re in the far left lane, always keep up your spatial awareness, and know how you could coast over to that far shoulder.

This mindfulness will greatly increase your chill if and when your car breaks down. Being chill is key—so that you don’t have that moment of panic, wildly scanning the road, missing something in your blind spot or changing lanes without signaling.

If you at all can, make your way all the way off the highway. You’ll know if you can, because up until this point you were being a good driver and making note of when the next exit was coming up. Be aware. Be prepared. Calmly curse the day you decided not to take auto shop class in high school.

 

After You’ve Pulled Over

Make your car visible. Turn your flashers on, unfold your triangles (you should really buy some high-visibility folding triangles), and set your flares if it’s dark and dreary and you’re gonna be stuck there for a while. Also don’t leave your car on the far side of a curve, or in a spot thats extra hard to see. Here’s a checklist:

  • Move away from your car. This is particularly true in the winter, say, if you skidded off the road. Somebody else might skid where you did, and hit your car. Don’t stand by it.
  • See if there’s something that’s visibly wrong. Did your battery get disconnected? Did you not notice that you ran out of gas? Is there a plume of steam coming out of the hood? Did one of your spark plug wires come loose? Is an unidentifiable fluid gushing forth from under your car?
  • Call a buddy. We all have a buddy. Somebody who knows your car better than you do. I have three people I can call in case one doesn’t pick up. They help me diagnose problems and they have helped me many times fix minor issues enough to get me home. Did that once involve me getting an electric shock re-connecting a spark plug with jumper cables? Most definitely. This is a key step, because you want an outside opinion on if you can fix this yourself or if you really do need to start making expensive decisions.
  • Call the tow truck. There is no shame in it. I have done it. We have all done it. Sometimes there’s nothing that can realistically be done to get your car back on the road, particularly if your alternator just died, or if you’re on the hard shoulder of I-40 in the middle of the night and you just dropped a valve. I know this from experience.
  • Let a professional figure out exactly what needs to be done. Let someone who knows what they’re doing tell you what’s wrong in order to get back on the road. Listen to everyone helping fix your car, learn something from them, and keep that knowledge in your mind when you’re next driving along, aware of what might go wrong next.

Once you have exited the fast, dangerous highway and made it out of the way of other fast, dangerous moving cars, really, that’s all you need to do. Things get easy from here, because your primary safety is taken care of and that’s what’s important.

Your Surroundings Are Key

The primary goal of these steps is to really, seriously minimize the amount of time that you’re physically on the side of the highway. Everything is a calculation for getting off the shoulder with 18 wheelers whizzing past you. Your call to the tow truck should be as swift as possible, but you should know that a tow truck probably isn’t going to get to you any sooner than an hour after you call. So if you are in a safe placeand able to do a quick roadside repair, like replacing the fan belt on your janky VW, or neatly executing a tire change, go for it.

 

Leaving Your Car On The Shoulder

These are highway-oriented steps, and if you end up broken down out in the middle of nowhere on a rural road, things are slightly different. Obviously the danger of being next to the highway disappears. If you have to abandon your car for whatever reason, there are a few things you can do while you leave it to go get help. Tie a shirt or rag or bag around the door handle, code that you’re going to return to your car, broken not abandoned. Call the police to let them know that your car is at a specific location, and broken not abandoned. And figure out how long your car can stay where it is without getting towed. It might take you some time to get your car back up and running. That’s fine!

We’ve all been there, and it’s no fun. As long as you keep safety in mind and keep your cool, you’ll be fine. Don’t give up! It’s going to be fine.

 

full article: http://adequateman.deadspin.com/what-to-do-if-your-car-breaks-down-in-traffic-1785455444

 

Or!

Do what we do and get a great running Ford today!

City Ford Sales

14750 Mark Messier Trail,
Edmonton, AB T6V 1H5, Canada
780-454-2000
https://www.cityfordsales.com/

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Ladies Love Their Rides

FORD MUSTANG BEATS FORD FOCUS RS BY ONE POINT TO BRING HOME THE TITLE OF WOMEN’S PERFORMANCE CAR OF THE YEAR 2016

DEARBORN, Mich., Dec. 21, 2016 – The iconic Ford Mustang has added yet another award to its trophy case – Women’s Performance Car of the Year 2016.

Up against a staggering 294 competitors, Mustang emerged as the top performance car in the Women’s World Car of the Year awards. The awards are determined by 17 judges across 14 countries – the only vehicle honors in the world granted by a panel made up entirely of women. Mustang’s closest contender was the critically acclaimed Ford Focus RS, with just one point separating the two.

“Ford Mustang is surprisingly loved by women who are after a sexy, sporty, masculine car that turns heads,” said Juliet Potter, Women’s World Car of the Year jury member from Australia. “Combining the car’s silver-screen celebrity status with real-life practicality, Mustang screams, ‘I am in control!’ and delivers the same behind the wheel with above-average grip and suspension.”

 

https://media.ford.com/content/fordmedia/fna/us/en/news/2016/12/21/ford-mustang-womens-performance-car-of-2016.html

Come in and test drive, or get yours, today!!

City Ford Sales

14750 Mark Messier Trail,
Edmonton, AB T6V 1H5, Canada
780-454-2000
https://www.cityfordsales.com/

 

Autumn Driving Hazards

autumn-driving-hazards

Changing seasons mean new risks on the road, no matter where you live.

Here are four seasonally specific driving hazards to watch out for this October and November.

Tire Pressure

Daytime temperatures might still be leaving you in short sleeves, but fall nights bring ever cooler temperatures. The fluctuation between day- and nighttime temperatures can affect the air pressure levels in your vehicle’s tires.

The temperature-induced expanding and contracting happening to the air inside your tires can lead to lesser tire pressure. This puts you at a higher risk of getting a flat tire—or of accidentally popping one with a curb check too hard.

Keep a vigilant eye on your tires and make sure they stay aired up all season long.

Wind Gusts

In many states, the transitional seasons (spring and fall) are known for bringing a lot of wind. But those strong gusts won’t just be blowing around falling leaves or tumbleweeds, depending on where you live.

Particularly windy days might bring unsafe driving conditions. For desert dwellers, that could mean dust storms; elsewhere, high winds could affect your ability to drive a straight line and stay out of other cars’ paths.

No matter where you’re driving into them, high winds also add drag to your car. This makes the vehicle work harder to maintain speed—and sinks your gas mileage.

Whether it’s visibility, control, or cash that’s at stake, be sure to check the weather and know when the winds might affect your commute. Consider taking the bus instead if that’s an option for you on really windy days.

More Moisture

Another effect of changing weather patterns in autumn is increased moisture. This might mean morning and evening fog, frost on the roads, or rain showers.

Mornings are particularly hazardous, as sleepy drivers head out into patch or thick fog, or the possibility of frost on the roads. Fog affects visibility, which could increase your chances of getting into a car accident, while frosty roads are a skid or slip hazard.

Exercise caution by giving yourself extra room to react, keeping your speed low, and maintaining a watchful eye on the road around you. The same goes for days when rain drizzles or showers make the roads slick.

Increased Traffic

Weather woes aren’t the only possible autumnal hazards on the roads. Increased traffic brings new dangers, as well.

With more people choosing to drive to work in poor weather, an influx of students on the roads in college towns, families home from their summer vacations, and snowbirds coming to town in the warmer climes, traffic is bound to be heavier than it was all summer.

Although the tourists and their lack of local road knowledge have left the road, the increase in locals and pseudo-locals can lead to longer and slower commutes, as well as more accidents in general. Pay attention to the drivers around you and give yourself space to react when others are driving dangerously or are not paying attention.

Being careful is the name of the game this fall. Enjoy the changing weather, but be sure to drive safely!

Experience the All-New 2016 Ford Focus RS for Yourself!

2016-ford-focus-rs-1-e1475512606126So, you think good things can’t come in small packages? Well, think again. “The Ford Focus deserves a look if you’re in the market for a fuel-efficient compact that comes with an extra helping of style, technology, comfort, =and a fun-to-drive nature,” reports Kelley Blue Book. Take a closer look at the all-new 2016 Ford Focus RS.

With its head-turning style and modern good looks, the 2016 Ford Focus RS has all the right moves. Don’t let its compact size fool you – the Focus RS delivers plenty of athleticism and power. This sleek hatchback features a rear spoiler, optional sun/moon roof, performance tires, aluminum wheels, and a choice of four exterior colors. The Focus RS has an overall length of 171.7 inches, overall height of 58.4 inches, overall width of 71.4 inches, and a wheelbase of 104.3 inches.

The 2016 Ford Focus RS’s well-designed cabin has been the recipient of rave reviews. Edmunds says, “The 2016 Focus has a handsome, high-quality interior that can be fitted with impressive technology features.” Left Lane News reports, “The Old World influence is clearly evident in the Focus’ classy cabin, which charms with high-quality materials and a distinctive design.” Standard features include rearview camera, Ford’s SYNC voice-control system, a USB port, Bluetooth, satellite radio with premium sound system, and MP3 player. Available features include blind spot monitoring, lane keep assist, navigation, dual-zone automatic climate control, and the new SYNC 3 infotainment system with an 8-inch touch screen. Standard safety features include driver air bag, side head air bag, 4-wheel ABS, brake assist, passenger air bag, side air bag, front disc and rear drum brakes, electronic stability control, child safety locks, and traction control.

The 2016 Ford Focus RS is powered by a turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder engine that produces an astounding 350 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque. All-wheel drive and a smooth six-speed manual transmission come standard. With exhilarating acceleration, agile handling, and top-of-its-class performance, the 2016 Focus RS delivers a truly exciting driving experience.

Yes, the 2016 Ford Focus RS packs a whole lot into a small package. “The RS offers a level of power and performance previously unknown in a domestic compact,” praises Kelley Blue Book. Experience the all-new 2016 Ford Focus RS for yourself: visit City Ford Sales for a test drive today!

The Dangers of Leaves on the Roads

fall_driving_infographic_article_590x306_copy_v4As weather and road conditions change with the season, following fall driving safety tips will help keep you safe as you enjoy the cool crisp air and the beautiful colors of the autumn leaves.

When leaves accumulate on the roadway and become wet, they can get extremely slippery, making the driving conditions similar to driving on ice. If the temperature drops below freezing, the wet leaves will freeze and turn into dangerous icy leaves on the roadway. Besides reducing the car’s traction, causing skidding and the possibility of losing control of the vehicle, leaves often cover the painted road markings, making it difficult to know the locations of the lanes.

  • Slow down if you are driving on a road covered with leaves, especially when driving around turns.
  • Allow yourself plenty of room to stop in an emergency. Keep a greater distance between you and the car in front of you.
  • Leaves make it difficult to see potholes and bumps in the road.
  • A pile of leaves raked to the side of the road is an inviting place to a child. Children enjoy jumping into the leaf piles or burrowing down into them and hiding. Never drive through a leaf pile. Use caution going around turns and where children are playing.
  • Keep your windshield leaf free to avoid wet leaves getting stuck under the windshield wiper blades.
  • In order to avoid the possibility of a fire hazard from the exhaust system or catalytic converter, never park your vehicle over a pile of leaves.

Changing Weather Conditions

In many areas, autumn is a damp, wet season. There are many rainy or foggy days and nights. As the temperatures drop, frost often coats the ground at night.

  • When driving in fog, set your headlight to low beam. This setting aims the beam of light down toward the roadway.
  • In the fall as temperatures drop, frost often forms on the roadway, causing hazardous driving conditions. Drive slowly and break gently at overpasses and bridges as these areas frost over more quickly than other roadway surfaces.
  • Be aware of areas where black ice forms on the roadway.