Extend the Life of Your Tires

car-brake-system

Follow these good driving habits to help you get the most mileage between brake service:

1. Plan Ahead

Instead of stomping on the brakes just before the stop sign, traffic light or turn, slow down well before the stop. Then the engine does some of the work, reducing wear and tear on your brakes. On the highway, lift your foot off the gas pedal as soon as you see brake lights ahead.

2. Use the Right Braking Method in the Mountains

If headed downhill or over the pass on dry pavement, drive in lower gears. Here’s how: Put your vehicle in the gear that allows you to travel at the safe speed when you start down the incline. Then apply the brakes intermittently with light pressure for about five seconds if your car speeds up, so you maintain the right speed. As in #1, this will let the engine do some of the work.

Note: This only slightly increases wear and tear on your engine. In normal driving, the “front face” of the gears and transmission wear down. With this kind of engine braking, the “back face” of the transmission does the work. You rarely engage the back face, so it’s a good trade between transmission and brake wear.

By balancing engine braking and pumping your brakes, you allow your brake system to cool. Riding the brakes down a long hill generates friction (which creates the stopping power you need). It also creates heat as your brake pads are in constant contact with the rotor. The longer the hill, the more friction and heat you generate, and the greater the wear on all brake system components—pads, shoes, fluid, brake calipers, rotors or drums and hoses.

It’s also a safety issue: Too much heat can also heat brake fluid, causing brake pedal fade, right when you need your brakes most.

Don’t use this technique when you are driving downhill in icy or slick conditions. Start at the top of the hill as slowly as possible and double the distance you’d normally give between you and the driver ahead. Assuming you’re driving a passenger vehicle (not a big rig), leave your auto in normal drive gear and use light, steady pressure on the brake pedal to maintain the right speed.

This allows your antilock braking system (ABS) to kick in instantly if you lose traction. When you use your engine for braking by downshifting, only your drive tires slow the car. (Your drive tires are the front two in a front-wheel drive auto, back tires in a rear-wheel drive, and all tires if you’re driving an AWD or 4WD vehicle). If the drive tires lose traction and your car starts to slide, the ABS won’t engage and you can lose control.

If you use the brakes instead, the ABS is ready to engage. ABS maintains traction by making sure all four tires slow at the same rate when you apply the brakes. You’ll minimize fishtailing and be able to steer in the proper direction.

3. Follow the Three-Second Rule

Pick a stationary object even with the car in front of you–a sign, a building, or a side road all work well. Then count to three. If you pass that object before you get to three, you need to back off and leave more space.

Remember driver’s ed? It was all about defensive driving and safe following distance. This style of driving is not only safest; it’s the easiest on your brake system. Stop-and-go traffic puts high demands on your brakes and decreases brake pad life. You can reduce the wear on your brakes by leaving enough space between you and the car ahead so you don’t have to tap the brakes as often.

Save Your Brakes: Drive Smart

Brake pads, shoes, drums and brake rotors will eventually need service for regular wear and tear. Be sure to follow your owner’s manual guidelines. If you think something’s wrong with your brakes, or one of your dashboard brake indicators is lit up, don’t wait to get your brakes checked.

Bottom line: Drive defensively, drive smart, and you’ll extend the life of your brakes.

Originally from: lesschwab.com

City Ford Sales
14750 Mark Messier Trail,
Edmonton, AB T6V 1H5, Canada
780-454-2000
City Ford Sales

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Shocks/Struts: 101

shocks and struts

WHY REPLACE SHOCKS AND STRUTS?

Struts are an integral component of your vehicle’s suspension system, and kind of important if things like handling, stopping, and riding in comfort matter to you. A way to visualize struts is simply to picture a shock absorber and coil spring combination, working together to smooth out bumps in the road. Improved handling, shorter stopping distances, and a smoother ride are the benefits you realize from changing struts. Air shock absorbers improve ride quality by limiting suspension movement. They also have a direct effect on handling and braking. Worn shocks can make for an uncomfortable ride, but, more importantly, they can compromise your ability to control the vehicle. So, it’s important to keep shocks ship-shape.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I CHANGE MY SHOCKS?

In general, you should inspect your air shock absorbers every 12,000 miles. Signs that your shocks may need attention include:

  • Diving during heavy braking
  • Wandering on the highway
  • Hitting bumps hard
  • Leaking shock fluid

Struts are wear items that absorb countless bumps in the road, which is why replacing struts on a car is recommended every 50,000 miles.

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SHOCKS AND STRUTS?

The words “shocks” and “struts” are often used interchangeably, but they aren’t the same thing. Each wheel on your car has either a shock or a strut, never both; although, a vehicle may have struts in the front and shocks in the rear. Consult your owner’s manual or speak to an Advance Team Member to be sure.

 

From: Advanceautoparts.com

City Ford Sales
14750 Mark Messier Trail,
Edmonton, AB T6V 1H5, Canada
780-454-2000
City Ford Sales

5 Tips to Prolong the Life of Your Tires

A few simple decisions about tires can help motorists avoid deadly mistakes on the road — especially in wet conditions.

1. Rotate tires every 5,000-7,000 miles. This will help tires wear at the same time.

2. Always put new tires on the back axle. It will help drivers keep control of their cars on wet roads. “Its doesn’t matter if you’re driving front-wheel drive, rear-wheel drive, or all-wheel drive,” said Sarah Robinson, a Michelin tire safety expert. “If you lose traction in the rear first, the car’s gonna spin. Physics always wins.”

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3. Keep tire pressure at the recommended level. Low tire pressure can cause tires to lose their grip on wet, rainy surfaces. How much pressure do your tires need? Look for the number in your car owner’s manual or on your car door.

4. Check tire pressure on a regular basis. “We want to do this once a month or before a long road trip. You want to do it in the morning when the pressures are cool and stabilized,” Robinson said.

5. Check tire tread depth regularly. This will help keep good traction on wet roads. An easy way to check tread depth is to use a quarter inserted upside down into the tire groove: If you can see above Washington’s head, start shopping for new tires.

From Today.com

City Ford Sales
14750 Mark Messier Trail,
Edmonton, AB T6V 1H5, Canada
780-454-2000
City Ford Sales

Experience the All-New 2016 Ford Focus RS for Yourself!

2016-ford-focus-rs-1-e1475512606126So, you think good things can’t come in small packages? Well, think again. “The Ford Focus deserves a look if you’re in the market for a fuel-efficient compact that comes with an extra helping of style, technology, comfort, =and a fun-to-drive nature,” reports Kelley Blue Book. Take a closer look at the all-new 2016 Ford Focus RS.

With its head-turning style and modern good looks, the 2016 Ford Focus RS has all the right moves. Don’t let its compact size fool you – the Focus RS delivers plenty of athleticism and power. This sleek hatchback features a rear spoiler, optional sun/moon roof, performance tires, aluminum wheels, and a choice of four exterior colors. The Focus RS has an overall length of 171.7 inches, overall height of 58.4 inches, overall width of 71.4 inches, and a wheelbase of 104.3 inches.

The 2016 Ford Focus RS’s well-designed cabin has been the recipient of rave reviews. Edmunds says, “The 2016 Focus has a handsome, high-quality interior that can be fitted with impressive technology features.” Left Lane News reports, “The Old World influence is clearly evident in the Focus’ classy cabin, which charms with high-quality materials and a distinctive design.” Standard features include rearview camera, Ford’s SYNC voice-control system, a USB port, Bluetooth, satellite radio with premium sound system, and MP3 player. Available features include blind spot monitoring, lane keep assist, navigation, dual-zone automatic climate control, and the new SYNC 3 infotainment system with an 8-inch touch screen. Standard safety features include driver air bag, side head air bag, 4-wheel ABS, brake assist, passenger air bag, side air bag, front disc and rear drum brakes, electronic stability control, child safety locks, and traction control.

The 2016 Ford Focus RS is powered by a turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder engine that produces an astounding 350 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque. All-wheel drive and a smooth six-speed manual transmission come standard. With exhilarating acceleration, agile handling, and top-of-its-class performance, the 2016 Focus RS delivers a truly exciting driving experience.

Yes, the 2016 Ford Focus RS packs a whole lot into a small package. “The RS offers a level of power and performance previously unknown in a domestic compact,” praises Kelley Blue Book. Experience the all-new 2016 Ford Focus RS for yourself: visit City Ford Sales for a test drive today!

Your New Ultimate Daily Driver: Introducing the 2017 Ford Fusion

The new 2017 Ford Fusion comes equipped with new features to make everyone’s drive a little easier and a lot more enjoyable. These features include a new infotainment system, pre-collision technology, adaptive cruise control and efficiency technology.

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  • Pre-collision assist with pedestrian detection technology. The 2017 Ford Fusion can detect vehicles and pedestrians. If your Ford Fusion detects a potential collision it has three collision prevention stages. First, it will mute the stereo and alert the driver with an audible chime and the flashing of red lights in the heads-up display. Second, the brakes precharge so that the brake pad is closer to the rotor, increasing brake sensitivity. Third, the brakes can automatically engage in an effort to prevent the collision.
  • Adaptive cruise control with stop and go. The 2017 Ford Fusion’s new adaptive cruise control with stop and go technology allows for you to set your cruise control and take your feet off the pedals. As you drive through traffic, the vehicle will automatically speed up to the preset speed and when traffic picks up, it will slow down to a complete stop if necessary.
  • The 2017 Ford Fusion comes with Sync 3. Sync 3 is an all new infotainment system with a more modern eight-inch LCD touch screen display. To make it even smarter, Sync Connect seamlessly works with your smartphone to utilize music, navigation and messaging, all while never taking your eyes off the road.
  • Drive more efficiently. Harnessing our competitive nature, Ford makes driving efficiently a simple game. What makes the efficiency leaves grow? Accelerating and braking smoothly, not driving aggressively and keeping your finger off the sport button. The more leaves you have the better you are doing. Ford also implemented engine efficiency for city driving. When you are stopped in traffic, the engine shuts off and when traffic moves forward the engine automatically starts!